Problems with CPU performance

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I feel you could assist me. I have an Intel i5-7300HQ processor with turbo boost up to 3.5GHz on one core and 3.1GHz on the others. I do get 3.1GHz, but it's throughout the board. I obtained the data using Intel XTU and MSI Afterburner, and no core exceeds 3.1GHz even when fully loaded. Please assist me đŸ˜§ I require the additional power so that I do not have to purchase a new laptop.

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It is a laptop, right? It is just not build to handle the additional heat from the overclock for a longer time of period, and will probably just auto clock down to not overheat. There is not really anything you can do about it.

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No there is, he can get a good cooling pad and run the laptop connected to the outlet which should allow it to run at it's maximum specs. But otherwise it's a laptop so still not much that can be done apart from getting a new one.

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Just give to laptop some fresh air under it
.

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@E33144211332424 and @Eternal
Props to you kings for actually offering solutions.

You must deceive the enemy, sometimes your allies, but you must always deceive yourself!

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@e33144211332424 said in Problems with CPU performance:

No there is, he can get a good cooling pad and run the laptop connected to the outlet which should allow it to run at it's maximum specs. But otherwise it's a laptop so still not much that can be done apart from getting a new one.

Most laptops still won't go to the max boost for long, regardless of temperature.

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That's why I said to run it connected to the outlet so that it won't be starved for energy. Can offcourse also go and play with bios settings and do other stuff to make sure it's all setup for sustaining as high of core clock as possible but considering the OP I think that simply getting cooling pad and running from outlet instead of on battery is the best advice we can give to him. Otherwise he wouldn't be asking how to make his laptop run better.

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A) You can use ThrottleStop to undervolt CPU cores and CPU cache. For example i have reduced my voltage by 75mV on my 7700HQ. This reduces power consumption (and therefore heat and fan noise) and gives your CPU more thermal and power budget to clock higher. However make sure that your CPU is still stable by doing a CPU stress test with a different program (like XTU) for 0,5 hours. If it crashes, reduce the unvervolt amount. Google for some common undervolts that people achieve on your CPU.

B) If your CPU cores are under 80 degrees during 0,5h stress test, you can try to increase thermal and power limits, for example with Intel XTU. After that you should again stress test to make sure your cores never go over 90 degrees. Note that running hotter will decrease the lifespan of your laptop, so i recommend A) instead / first.

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@e33144211332424 said in Problems with CPU performance:

That's why I said to run it connected to the outlet so that it won't be starved for energy. Can offcourse also go and play with bios settings and do other stuff to make sure it's all setup for sustaining as high of core clock as possible but considering the OP I think that simply getting cooling pad and running from outlet instead of on battery is the best advice we can give to him. Otherwise he wouldn't be asking how to make his laptop run better.

Even if on grid power; most laptops have a limit somewhere. Even my Workstation Thinkpad with big heatsink and fan will not go to the max boost on the CPU if you also load the GPU a bunch. Even with low temperatures. Probably some internal power supply unit that is used to it's max. If I decrease GPU load, the CPU will again boost higher.

That's why a desktop is so nice, because if you pick the parts right, it's cheap, not noisy and has consistent high performance.

Use a laptop if you have some absolute need for mobile computing. For everything else it's just a stupid trend. Desktops rule.